MeetsExpectations

 

If you've ever had to give or receive a performance review in corporate America than you're probably familiar with the ME: Meets Expectations assesment box. 

While the business world would view this as a satisfactory-at-best analysis I've found it can bring some - at times much needed - perspective to your personal relationships.

Try this #LifeHack and find peace.  

Let's face it, people are who they are. We know this to be true, yet we expect them to change more than we realize. In each of our lives there are people that touch nerves on a consistent basis. Some family members excel at it, chummy business associates make games of it, lifelong friends even do it for fun. 

They frustrate us.

Exasperate us.

Annoy us to no end.

But what if its not them? What if its us. 

This one idea has allowed me to temper those feelings, avoid explosive confrontations, and restore some internal peace (even momentary) in their presence. 

When you feel the frustration building, put on your performance review hat in your mind and start grading. 

Ask these questions: 

Is this behavior something I've experienced before? Yes? Well then they're Meeting Expectations

Is this consistent with their character? Yes? Meeting Expectations.

If they stopped doing what they're doing would I even recognize them? No? Again, Meeting Expecations!

 

When we begin to expect people to be WHO THEY ARE, then we cannot be frustrated, disappointed, exasperated, annoyed, etc, etc, etc when they meet our expectations. 

 

What's even better is that if they fall short of our expectations - It's a very good thing!

On the rare occasion that they may exceed our expectations, they become easier to tolerate because our baseline was who they are, not who we want them to be. 

 

Our biggest opportunity for change lies within ourselves - and that is true here as well. 

Change your expectations to reflect who you know people to be and accept them when they are who you know they are. 

Find Peace. 

Got any other tips on dealing with frustration in intrapersonal relationships? Join the conversation with us!